Lucas Ratton

Located in the heart of the iconic district of Saint Germain des Prés, Galerie Lucas Ratton is specialized in high-quality Tribal Art. It showcases among others sculptures, masks, magical piece, headdresses and fetish figures.

Lucas Ratton

Located in the heart of the iconic district of Saint Germain des Prés, Galerie Lucas Ratton is specialized in high-quality Tribal Art. It showcases among others sculptures, masks, magical piece, headdresses and fetish figures.

Tribal Art

33 rue de Seine
75006 Paris, FR

+33 (0) 1 46 33 06 24
[email protected]

Kasimir Malevitch - Massimo De Carlo
Songye fetish

Ethnic group : SONGYE
Country : Democratic Republic of Congo
Period : 19th century
Material : Wood, metal, oozing patina, fibers and ritual agglomerate
Height : 64 cm

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Interview with Lucas Ratton ~ Founder

Massimo De Carlo

Lucas Ratton in his Parisian gallery, 2019

Interview by Pauline Loeb-Obrenan, founder of artfairmag.

Tribal Art has always been a family affair for Lucas Ratton as his grand-father Maurice and great-uncle Charles were both Tribal Art dealers. Since 2012, where he opened his own gallery after 5 years having a stall at the world famous Flea market ‘Les Puces de Clignancourt’, he perpetuates this tradition of excellence. I spoke to this young and dynamic art dealer to know more about his views on art fairs.

artfairmag: In 2012, you have opened your own gallery rue de Seine in Paris. Can you tell us more about your first participation in an art fair?

Lucas Ratton: The very first art fair I participated in was « Le Salon du collectionneur » at le Grand Palais in 2007 where I had the chance to be the « Invité d’honneur ». It was my first experience and it was interesting for me to encounter so many specialized collectors in a short time. It was also for me the chance to learn the organization of a fair, its mounting and development.

artfairmag: You participate in fairs that are dedicated to Tribal Art, as Paris Tribal, Parcours des Mondes, but also in more generalist fairs like TEFAF and PAD. How do you adapt to the clientele of these last two, perhaps less knowledgeable on this specific art?

L. R.: For every fair, I always make a very high quality selection of african art objects, adapted to initiates or more neophyte collectors, trying to mix in the same time very classical objects to more atypical ones.

artfairmag: Your gallery in Paris is very intimate. Does the atmosphere of an art fair change the way you interact with collectors?

L. R.: Not really. I try to always re create a space where I can interact with my collectors in a more personal way, a beautiful office space with a Chareau office or a Gae Aulenti sofa for example. I think it is important for the collector that sees so many objects in art fair to be able to enter a stand and thus enter a universe.
I am very passionate about design and paintings amongst other and I like to provoke interactions between these different arts and Tribal art, that all have a link and communicate.

“For every fair, I always make a very high quality selection of african art objects, adapted to initiates or more neophyte collectors”

artfairmag: You have a reputation for being focused on Arts of Western Africa but you recently opened up new horizons with South Africa, Tanzania, Brazil and Haida Art. Do you mix them all in art fairs?

L. R.: It is true that I am mostly specialized in African art and am very keen on Ivory Coast in particular, but indeed I also am very interested in other tribal arts. I thus sometimes present art from Oceania or American Indian objects when I found masterpieces.

artfairmag: The next fair you will participate in is TEFAF Maastricht. Can you tell us a few words about one artwork special for you that will be showcased in your stand?

L. R.: This year, I decided to present amongst other a very powerful Songye fetish figure from the Democratic Republic of Congo (illustrated). It is a very important piece, by its quality and history. I do not have the habit to present this kid of piece but this one is particular. My aim for this year will be to create as always a universe, this time even more refined, by integrating to my African Art selection of masterpieces, works from the Art Déco world, and an important painting.

artfairmag: You are part of the new generation of art dealers and I presume you know how to enjoy the city of Maastricht during the fair. Can you share some places you like with our readers that will come to TEFAF in March?

L. R.: I am personally very keen on the Beaumont hotel where I always stay and I really like their Harry’s Bar, unavoidable meeting point for the collectors, museum directors and dealers.
And as for the « night owls », there are always nice bars in the city, where you might also met the same collectors, museum directors and dealers!

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